MEEKNESS = POWER

“In a land of plenty where there is bread and wine in sufficiency, abasement does not come easily. In a land of materialism where there is money in sufficiency, abasement is not easily learned. In a land where there is little persecution and suffering for the gospel’s sake, there is almost no meekness of soul found among My people.” (Holy Spirit inspired utterance)

God has shown me that there is a connection between meekness and miracles and the power of God. It is something that needs to be cultivated greatly in the Church today.

The greatness of Jesus was in His meekness. Before Jesus abounded in power (Lk 4:14) He was abased (to be brought low) and humbled Himself (Phil 2:8 Amp).  The Lamb was meek and lowly (Mat 11:29).  He did not fight or struggle with God.  His soul was under the rule and reign of God the Father.  The Spirit of Christ in a man has no mind of its own.  It is totally under the authority of Another. This is the spirit that is better than the mighty and can take a city (Pr 16:32). It is meekness.  This is the spirit that the Holy Spirit told me is so lacking in among God’s people.

Moses’ greatness was not in the miracles He worked, but in the meekness God worked in him.  “Now the man Moses was very meek, above all the men which were upon the face of the earth” (Num 12:3).

A spirit of meekness was developed in Moses’ life through frustration in the flesh.  He came to the end of himself until he stopped relying on his own efforts. In the Old Covenant God dealt with Israel and his prophets according to the flesh because of the deadness of their spirits.  In the New Covenant God’s desire is for meekness to be developed according to the building up of the new life and new nature that is now in our spirits.

Praying in other tongues and fasting have been called the power twins because one subdues the flesh while the other builds up the spirit. Together along with the Word of God they cultivate meekness in your soul.

Smith Wigglesworth made the comment that he often felt like he’d been run over by a thousand railroad engines.  Paul said that he died daily (1 Cor 15:31).  There is a pain which leads to gain.  There is a lonely walk which draws the communion of the Holy Spirit.  There is a dying that generates the fulness of the life and power of God.

When I speak of God’s power I am not speaking of moving in the gifts of the Holy Spirit, for the gifts and callings of God are irrevocable and many men have been anointed with the gifts while still living in sin and disobedience. Remember the examples of Samson in the Old Testament and Judas in the New Testament. Eventually judgement will catch up with such vessels unless they come to repentance. The power I am speaking of is what some have called a resident anointing, which is an anointing that comes to abide. I believe this is true individually and corporately. Smith Wigglesworth walked in this when he would challenge audiences that the first person to come forward in his meetings would be healed. He went on to say that a minister has to be in the right place with God to even give out that sort of challenge and see results.

There is no other way into the real power of God except through dying. The Church has continually attempted to shortcut this process, thinking they can obtain the true power and glory of God some other way, but it can never be. The result will either be more dead religion, hype and sensationalism, or just a form of godliness void of God’s power.

Religion causes sin to abound.  The new nature causes grace to abound. The body of Christ must renew its mind and feed and develop the new life and nature of God in them until it grows to the measure of the stature of the fullness of Christ.  Then and only then will the sons of God manifest the love and the power of God to a lost and dying world.  Then and only then will the world  know that Jesus is Lord.

Praying in the Spirit and fasting are virtually lost practices in much of the Church – thus the reason for the famine of the true power of God. Let’s seek the Lord and get it back.

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4 thoughts on “MEEKNESS = POWER

  1. It blesses me that your posts-teachings get to the heart of the Faith! Am I right that meekness=neediness? It’s obvious our society, along with often believers, and the Church act, and think as if we don’t need Him (like Israel); then, as far as following Him, and learning to do His will, we live our lives for ourselves, under our direction–sometimes as you said, calling God’s will what is really a concoction of our own! I think it’s an awesome thing to try to understand — if God had total control of our lives, like Jesus, what would that look like? How dependent, and one with Him could we become; and wouldn’t we go in that direction through suffering, and the flesh being put to death? Thinking of Paul’s prayer, concerning power, he prayed to know the “fellowship of His sufferings–being made conformable to His death.” I love the book, They Found the Secret, by V. R. Edman, as it gives the life stories, and spiritual things learned by well known believers. Charles Trumbull came to understand that he didn’t need to ask God to help him; but rather to do His work, and will through him, as if they were one. Others spoke like this, and the rest, and peace that comes leaving everything, and trusting Him with everything–that we are “…never to have another care, or fear.” Hudson Taylor says a lot about His life, Him in us…that to bear fruit will not come by our efforts; but by “…a complete surrender, and constant looking to Him for grace.” Then he describes what the “oneness” might work out like…”Christ reminds of every duty in its time and place, reproves for every error, counsels in every difficulty, and excites to every needful activity.” What an intimate walk that would be; and it seems it would take courage, as I think there could be fear to be that dependent on God, as we might have to endure, or wait, or do difficult or unreasonable things that would go against the flesh, and our wills!

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